Well, That was Amazing!

Our 2021 Summer Report is ready for you! Our three interns worked hard to learn more about the watershed, and made the most comprehensive report yet.

Cover page of the annual report, showing fish swimming underwater
Read the report here!

This year our summer students Jonas Gow and Keeler Colton and Arianne Janes focused on two projects: a beaver monitoring project and a cold water refugia project, with some other smaller projects on the side such as water quality, and looking for endangered Bank Swallows, Atlantic Salmon, and Wood Turtles. Each week they would meet on the river from Monday to Wednesday to carry out these projects and explore the watershed looking for species of interest. Between Thursday and Friday the they would summarize the data and work on community engagement through social media. All field work done this summer was either on the freshwater portion of the river between Berwick and Kentville, or its many tributary systems such as Sharpe Brook, Lawrence Brook, and Mill Brook. This year our summer students Jonas Gow and Keeler Colton and Arianne Janes focused on two projects: a beaver monitoring project and a cold water refugia project, with some other smaller projects on the side such as water quality, and looking for endangered Bank Swallows, Atlantic Salmon, and Wood Turtles. Each week they would meet on the river from Monday to Wednesday to carry out these projects and explore the watershed looking for species of interest. Between Thursday and Friday the they would summarize the data and work on community engagement through social media. All field work done this summer was either on the freshwater portion of the river between Berwick and Kentville, or its many tributary systems such as Sharpe Brook, Lawrence Brook, and Mill Brook.

Keeler, Jonas and Arianne spent a lot of time on the watershed this year while walking its tributaries looking for Beaver activity and Wood Turtles. Many of these areas were new to our summer students and many important areas were found with high biodiversity. Interns canoed the entire freshwater portion of the river from Berwick to Kentville while looking for stream outflows for cold water refugia, Wood Turtles, and Bank Swallow nesting sites. This two day trip gave interns great appreciation for the river and understanding of the degradation it faces.

We couldn’t have done it without them! Thank you Keeler, Jonas and Arianne!

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